Some PC Repair Methods:

   

CAUTION: BEFORE RUNNING ANY ANTI-VIRUS OR ANTI-MALWARE PROGRAM, BE SURE YOUR IMPORTANT FILES ARE BACKED UP!!!!

  
Launching Command Prompt
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WINDOWS 10: click on the Windows Start menu icon in the lower left corner of the screen (shown to the left) and simply start typing comm. A Best Match box will pop up showing Command Prompt Desktop app. Right-Click on the Command Prompt and select “Run as administrator”. You can also select “Pin to Start” which puts a tile on the Start menu for the app.

If a User account Control window opens asking “Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device? click Yes.
   
Checking IP Address
With the Command Prompt open as an Administrator.

You will see a blinking underscore, simply type the following command:

ipconfig

and press “return”

You will see displayed some information about your network adapter. Look down the list for:

IPv4 Address…

It will list a number like: 192.168.1.100

Note that number, it is the IP (Internet Address) of your computer.

Below that you’ll see the entry:

Default Gateway…

Note that number, it is the IP address of your router that connects you to the Internet. It may look something like this: 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.254

  
Testing Network Connection
Now that you know the IP address of your router, with the Command Prompt still open as the Administrator, type the following command at the blinking underscore prompt:

ping [IP address of router]

example:
ping 192.168.1.1
then press “return

If your connection to the router is working, you’ll see something like the following displayed:

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in mlli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms


The above report shows that your connection is working, you sent out 4 pings of data and got back 4 replies, so you are talking to your router.

If you got back the following:

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),


Then you are not talking to your router and you won’t be able to reach the Internet.

Test your Internet connection by typing the following command:

ping www.google.com
then press “return

If you are connected to the Internet, you should see something like this:

Pinging www.google.com [216.58.217.4] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 216.58.217.4: bytes=32 time=45ms TTL=128
Reply from 216.58.217.4: bytes=32 time=70ms TTL=128
Reply from 216.58.217.4: bytes=32 time=44ms TTL=128
Reply from 216.58.217.4: bytes=32 time=42ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 216.58.217.4:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 42ms, Maximum = 70ms, Average = 50ms


This shows you are able to talk to the Google.com web server, so you should be able to open your web browser (i.e., Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Google Chrome or Firefox) and browse the Internet.

If you still can’t browse the Internet…Call Dr. Bob
  
Test Windows System Files
With the Command Prompt open as administrator, issue the following command:

sfc /scannow

then press “return

Windows will scan through the system files looking for problems to repair, if needed. This may take several minutes to complete so be patient. (sfc stands for System File Check).

You’ll see something like this as the test proceeds:

Beginning system scan. This process will take some time.

Beginning verification phase of system scan.
Verification xx% complete. (xx will count up to 100%)

Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.

Hopefully, you get that last line indicating no problems were found. You might get back information indicating something was found and, hopefully, it was repaired. If not, Call Dr. Bob.

   
Check Hard Drive
To find out if your hard drive is failing with bad areas developing, you need to run the Disk Check software Microsoft provides. You will run it from the Command Prompt when you are the administrator.

So launch the Command Prompt as the Administrator as described above.

At the blinking underscore, type the following command and press the return key.

CHKDSK C: /f/r

A message will be presented asking if you want to schedule the CHKDSK scan to run on reboot. Type

Y

and press return. Then reboot the computer. On reboot, you should get a message saying that CHKDSK is getting ready to run and to press any key to abort. Don’t press anything, just let it run. It will run through 5 stages. What you are looking for are any error messages saying that bad blocks have been found…you don’t want to see error messages. If you do see error messages indicating there are bad blocks, the hard drive will need to be replaced. If you don’t have a backup of your important files and pictures, make sure you make a backup right away.

The /f tells the command to fix problems it finds and not just report on them. The /r tells the command to try to move any data found in a bad block to a reserve block and mark the bad block so it isn’t used again.